Artificial intelligence has detected brain trauma formerly visible only in autopsies

Pittsburgh Penguins’ Sidney Crosby (87) lies on the ice after taking a hit on May 1, 2017. The Penguins captain who suffered what is believed to be the fourth concussion of his NHL career. Gene J. Puskar / THE ASSOCIATED PRESS Montreal is all about artificial intelligence. We’ve heard about its impact on business and industry and how Quebec pledged in May to commit $100 million to AI over the next five years. But AI is leaving its mark on neuroscience as well and could help clarify research on concussions and brain trauma — topics that continue to give scientists headaches. A preliminary study — conducted by the Montreal Neurological Institute and Hospital, Université de Montréal and the Ludmer Centre for Neuroinformatics — used AI software to detect the long-term effects of brain trauma on former athletes, something that could only be done in the past after the affected individuals were dead. “It’s a very, very powerful technique,” said Sebastien Tremblay, a PhD researcher at the Montreal Neurological Institute and Hospital. “It’s definitely revolutionizing the neurosciences right now.” The study, which was released in May and led by Université de Montréal researcher and neuropsychologist Louis de Beaumont, examined the brains of…


Link to Full Article: Artificial intelligence has detected brain trauma formerly visible only in autopsies

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